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BBC launches dedicated iPlayer Radio apps for iPad and Android tablets

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 11:48
Provided you're somewhere with a stable internet connection, it's now perfectly possible to replace your old-fashioned radio set with a tablet. Most stations have a dedicated app these days and it's easy enough to connect a pair of headphones or a ch...

MTV adds a live feed to its Android and iOS apps

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 11:12
You've been able to catch up with episodes of Jersey Shore through MTV's iOS and Android apps for around a year. But, if you wanted to gasp along with the action as it was broadcast, you'd have to make an appointment to take over the family TV. Thank...

Amazon offers one-hour deliveries with Prime Now

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 11:01
Amazon has just launched a new service called Prime Now, which will let Prime members order "tens of thousands" of "daily essentials" for immediate delivery. Once you download the new app (on Android or iOS), you'll get the option of picking a one- o...

Startup Helps You Build Your Very Own Picosatellite On a Budget

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 10:31
Zothecula writes A Glasgow-based startup is reducing the cost of access to space by offering "satellite kits" that make it easier for space enthusiasts, high schools and universities alike to build a small but functional satellite for as little as US$6,000 and then, thanks to its very small size, to launch for significantly less than the popular CubeSats.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NASA delays 'capture the asteroid' plan until next year

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 10:09
Now that the ESA has landed on a comet, NASA wants to do them one better: capture an entire asteroid (or a piece of one) and put it in orbit around the moon in 2019. That's the Asteroid Redirect Mission in a nutshell, and the space agency has now sai...

UK carriers agree £5 billion coverage improvements to avoid 'national roaming'

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 09:14
Ever since the notion of national roaming first appeared back in June, the UK government and the four major mobile operators have fought over how best to rid Britain of so-called "not-spots." Culture Secretary Sajid Javid wanted to implement a system...

Derby the dog got 3D-printed paw prothethics, now watch him run

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 08:59
Derby was born with deformations in both of his front legs, making movement and any kind of speed difficult, if not impossible. Now, he can run. The husky mix was fitted out with two prosthetics, custom-made on 3D sculpting software to fit the pup's ...

San Francisco's Bay Bridge keeps its computer-controlled lights

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 08:02
The 25,000 computer-driven LED lights on San Francisco's Bay Bridge were only meant to be part of a two-year art project, but it looks like they'll eventually become a permanent (and frankly, rather pretty) part of the landscape. The non-profit behin...

RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 08:01
An anonymous reader writes A pair of trousers and blazer have been developed by San Francisco-based clothing company Betabrand and anti-virus group Norton that are able to prevent identity theft by blocking wireless signals. The READY Active Jeans and the Work-It Blazer contain RFID-blocking fabric within the pockets' lining designed to prevent hacking through radio frequency identification (RFID) signals emitted from e-passports and contactless payment card chips. According to the clothing brand, this form of hacking is an increasing threat, with "more than 10 million identities digitally pick pocketed every year [and] 70% of all credit cards vulnerable to such attacks by 2015."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Microsoft's Xim app now lets you share smartphone photos on bigger screens

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 06:35
Microsoft Research's Xim app for sharing photos can now beam slideshows on screens bigger than phones and tablets through streaming devices. Just log into the wireless network all your other devices are connected to and it will automatically detect a...

Terrestrial Gamma Ray Bursts Very Common

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 05:28
Rambo Tribble writes It was long thought that gamma ray bursts were the exclusive province of deep space sources. More recently it was found that storms could produce such emissions, but such occurrences were thought rare. Now, data from NASA's Fermi satellite suggest such events happen over a thousand times a day. Per Prof. Joseph Dwyer, from the University of New Hampshire, "These are big, monster bursts of gamma rays, and one would think these must be monster storms producing them. But that's not the case. Even boring-looking, garden-variety, little storms can produce these."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Sprint could face $105 million fine over unauthorized customer billing

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 04:32
Sprint can't catch a break. As if its financial woes weren't enough, the outfit was recently accused of letting consumers get billed for "tens of millions" of dollars in unauthorized charges for premium text messages between 2004 and 2013. The Consum...

Over 9,000 PCs In Australia Infected By TorrentLocker Ransomware

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 03:04
First time accepted submitter River Tam writes Cybercriminals behind the TorrenLocker malware may have earned as much as $585,000 over several months from 39,000 PC infections worldwide, of which over 9,000 were from Australia. If you're a Windows user in Australia who's had their files encrypted by hackers after visiting a bogus Australia Post website, chances are you were infected by TorrentLocker and may have contributed to the tens of thousands of dollars likely to have come from Australia due to this digital shakedown racket.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Over 9,000 PCs In Australia Infected By TorrentLocker Ransomware

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 03:04
First time accepted submitter River Tam writes Cybercriminals behind the TorrenLocker malware may have earned as much as $585,000 over several months from 39,000 PC infections worldwide, of which over 9,000 were from Australia. If you're a Windows user in Australia who's had their files encrypted by hackers after visiting a bogus Australia Post website, chances are you were infected by TorrentLocker and may have contributed to the tens of thousands of dollars likely to have come from Australia due to this digital shakedown racket.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cuba's renewed US relations will bring internet upgrades

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 02:57
It would be an understatement to call Cuba's existing telecoms modest -- roughly five percent of residents have internet access, and cellphone access is pricey at best. The US may just turn that situation around through its new deal with Cuba, though...

webOS 2.0 will make LG's smart TVs much faster next year

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 02:00
The usual pre-CES flood of information is under way, and LG is announcing details of the webOS 2.0 package its smart TVs will ship with in 2015. Improving on the menus we already dug at last year's show, LG says that the new versions will improve mai...

Engadget Daily: Sony postpones 'The Interview,' Gear VR review and more!

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 01:13
In case you hadn't heard, things are still going dreadfully south for Sony Pictures. In response to a new wave of threats from its GOP cyberattackers, the studio has been coerced to postpone its December 25th theatrical premiere of The Interview. Fin...

Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 01:11
mrspoonsi writes The proposal was made by the Google developers working on the search firm's Chrome browser. The proposal to mark HTTP connections as non-secure was made in a message posted to the Chrome development website by Google engineers working on the firm's browser. If implemented, the developers wrote, the change would mean that a warning would pop-up when people visited a site that used only HTTP to notify them that such a connection "provides no data security". Currently only about 33% of websites use HTTPS, according to statistics gathered by the Trustworthy Internet Movement which monitors the way sites use more secure browsing technologies. In addition, since September Google has prioritised HTTPS sites in its search rankings.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Startup Magic Leap Hires Sci-Fi Writer Neal Stephenson As Chief Futurist

Slashdot - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 00:36
First time accepted submitter giulioprisco writes Magic Leap, a secretive Florida augmented reality startup that raised $542 million in October, hired renowned science fiction writer Neal Stephenson as its "Chief Futurist." Stephenson offers hints at the company's technology and philosophy: "Magic Leap is bringing physics, biology, code, and design together to build a system that is going to blow doors open for people who create things." According to the Magic Leap website, their Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal technology permits generating images indistinguishable from real objects.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Android Wear puts Inbox by Gmail updates on your wrist

Engadget - Thu, 18/12/2014 - 00:08
You may have to give up a few things from Gmail to use Google's task-oriented Inbox email app, but smartwatch support isn't one them. The company has updated the app (on Android) to bring Android Wear support, letting you check mail, send replies and...

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